1. Mining

Bitcoin mining is performed by high-powered computers that solve complex computational math problems; these problems are so complex that they cannot be solved by hand and are complicated enough to tax even incredibly powerful computers. The result of bitcoin mining is twofold. First, when computers solve these complex math problems on the bitcoin network, they produce new bitcoin (not unlike when a mining operation extracts gold from the ground). And second, by solving computational math problems, bitcoin miners make the bitcoin payment network trustworthy and secure by verifying its transaction information.


When someone sends bitcoin anywhere, it's called a transaction. Transactions made in-store or online are documented by banks, point-of-sale systems, and physical receipts. Bitcoin miners achieve the same thing by clumping transactions together in “blocks” and adding them to a public record called the “blockchain.” Nodes then maintain records of those blocks so that they can be verified in the future.


When bitcoin miners add a new block of transactions to the blockchain, part of their job is to make sure that those transactions are accurate. In particular, bitcoin miners make sure that bitcoin is not being duplicated, a unique quirk of digital currencies called “double-spending.” With printed currencies, counterfeiting is always an issue. But generally, once you spend $20 at the store, that bill is in the clerk’s hands. With digital currency, however, it's a different story.


2. Online Trading Exchanges

Bitcoin exchange platforms match buyers with sellers. Like a traditional stock exchange, traders can opt to buy and sell bitcoin by inputting either a market order or a limit order. When a market order is selected, the trader is authorizing the exchange to trade the coins for the best available price in the online marketplace. With a limit order set, the trader directs the exchange to trade coins for a price below the current ask or above the current bid, depending on whether they are buying or selling.


To transact in bitcoin on an exchange, a user has to register with the exchange and go through a series of verification processes to authenticate their identity. Once the authentication is successful, an account is opened for the user who then has to transfer funds into this account before they can buy coins.


Different exchanges have different payment methods that can be used for depositing funds including bank wires, direct bank transfers, credit or debit cards, bank drafts, money orders, and even gift cards. A trader who would like to withdraw money from the account could do so using the options provided by their exchange, which could include a bank transfer, PayPal transfer, check mailing, cash delivery, bank wire, or credit card transfer.


3. Faucet

A cryptocurrency faucet is an app or a website that distributes small amounts of cryptocurrencies as a reward for completing easy tasks. They’re given the name “faucets'' because the rewards are small, just like small drops of water dripping from a leaky faucet. However, in the case of crypto faucets, tiny amounts of free or earned cryptocurrency are sent to a user’s wallet. In order to get free crypto, users need to complete tasks as simple as viewing ads, watching product videos, completing quizzes, clicking links (be careful!), or completing a captcha.


Cryptocurrency faucets are certainly not a get-rich-quick scheme. The simpler the task, the lesser the reward. Most websites offer a minimum payout threshold, so the rewards earned by completing tasks are deposited into an online wallet of the site. A user can withdraw this reward only after reaching the minimum set threshold. With the best crypto faucets, this might take just a day, but often, it can take longer than a week.